Traditional recipes

"Warm Your Corn" Makes for Perfect, Pop-Free Hot Popcorn


Innovative, microwave-safe bag heats pre-popped corn

If you’re fundamentally unable to successfully pop popcorn without burning the kernels, but also too wary to indulge the fiscal and caloric cost of actual movie theater popcorn, you’re probably familiar with Popcorn, Indiana’s ready-to-eat line of popcorn that’s stepped in to save the day.

For fans of the brand, things are about to get even better, with the release of the snack company’s feat of popcorn engineering, the “Warm Your Corn” microwavable popcorn bag.

What it does is essentially cut out the middleman. Instead of standing with your ear trained on the microwave counting the seconds between pops, you can just pop the specially designed “high moisture barrier” bag in the microwave and go set up the DVD player. Return in 60 seconds to a bag of perfectly pre-popped and now warmed popcorn ready to munch during your movie, just like a trip to the theater but minus the astronomical price tag.

Or you can just skip those steps and devour it straight from the bag — not a choice to be overlooked.

“Warm Your Corn” is basically the futuristic spaceship of popcorn innovation, but it’s low-cost and made of all natural ingredients and materials. Grab a bag from your closest Popcorn, Indiana retailer starting this month.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Perfect Homemade Stovetop Popcorn

Not only is popcorn tasty and economical (for mere pennies you can enjoy a quart at home), it’s also easy to prepare. Whether you choose to pop popcorn in an electric popper, on the stove or over an open fire, follow these tips for perfectly popped popcorn: First, warm the popper, heavy pan or skillet. If oil popping your corn, add 1/3 cup of cooking oil (we prefer coconut oil) to the pan. Allow the oil to heat. The best popping temperature is between 400 and 460 degrees Fahrenheit. Oil burns at 500 degrees. If your oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. The less saturated the fat in the oil (like corn or sunflower), the less calories you will add to your snack. Do not pop popcorn in butter. Butter will burn. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in one or two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you’re ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Continually shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pan and continually shake gently over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape from popping kernels. Remove pan from heat when popping slows or stops and carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl. Season to taste. Or use your imagination to add flavorings that impart your special tastes.


Watch the video: MAGIC MEN - POP CORN (January 2022).