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20 Things You Didn't Know About Guinness

20 Things You Didn't Know About Guinness


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Let's toast one to Arthur Guinness this St. Patrick's Day

Guinness facts for St. Patrick's Day.

With the beginning of March comes everyone's favorite excuse to toss back a few — Saint Patrick's Day. And while some may think that green-colored beer is the only way to enjoy a cold one this March, we'd rather share a Guinness or two.

Click here to see 20 Facts You Didn't Know About Guinness Slideshow

The best-known of Irish beers, Guinness has taken the world by storm since its inception in the 1770s. It is now brewed in 49 countries and sold in more than 150, and it's hard to go anywhere without seeing your beloved Guinness on tap (even in Africa, where 40 percent of Guinness is consumed today). And it's all due to Arthur Guinness, whose porter recipe took off.

We were surprised by what we learned about Guinness. There's a science to the perfection of a perfect pour, the Guinness bubbles (really — physicists have taken it upon themselves to figure those little suckers out), and how to properly enjoy a pint. (Though the answer shouldn't surprise you; the best way is to drink a pint in a pub in Ireland, obviously). But Guinness has a long storied history that makes it so popular worldwide.

Click here to find fun facts about your Guinness pint — and find 20 reasons to toast one to Arthur Guinness. Good thing he's got that lease on the St. James Gate brewery for a few more thousand years.


20 Things You Didn't Know About Guinness - Recipes

10 Things you didn't know about Guinness

1 Arthur Guinness signed a lease for the disused St. James Brewery 1759 for: 9000 years at 45 francs a year

2 1n 1886 the Guinness brewery was the largest brewery in the world producing: 1.2 Million Barrels a year

3 In 1906 there were 3,240 employees at the brewery meaning that 10,000 people were dependent on Guinness for their livelihood - This was 1 in 30 of the population of Dublin

4 1939 - Guinness sent all British troops in the British expeditionary force in France a bottle of Guinness to enjoy with their Christmas Dinner.

5 Guinness is the biggest selling stout in the world
Brewed in 50 countries
Sold in 150 countries
10 million glasses are drunk around the world every day

6 Half of all pints consumed in Ireland everyday is a pint of Guinness.

7 There is approximately 198 calories in a pint of Guinness
Less than a pint of Orange Juice!

8 Guinness & Co. Makes almost 2 Billion annually.

9 The perfect pour
119.5 seconds
Double pour at a 45 degree angle


The story of Dracula takes place in Transylvania, however, the author, Bram Stoker (who was Irish, by the way) is believed to have gotten the inspiration for his famous story from the Irish legend of Abhartach. The Abhartach was an evil creature who, despite being killed multiple times, kept rising from his grave and drinking the blood of his victims. For more about Irish books, read this post.

Ireland’s Tailteann Games can be traced back as far as 1600BCE, though have been historically proven to be held from the 6 th -12 th century. They Tailteann games were a variety of athletic contests that were held in honour of the deceased goddess Tailtiu. Tailtu was said to have died of exhaustion after cleaning Ireland’s fields for agricultural purposes. The Tailteann games still exist in Ireland today.


11 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Guinness

Before it became the signature beverage of drunken parades and fraternity parties everywhere, Guinness was a community-minded company championing human rights causes and saving Irish architectural landmarks. And forget what you’ve heard about the ultra-calorific, “meal in a glass” myth a pint of Guinness is surprisingly health-conscious.

This St. Patrick’s Day, ditch the disappointing green brews and right all your Guinness-related wrongs. We’ve got the truth about the Emerald Isle’s oft-misunderstood quintessential brew. Sláinte!

1. What’s in a name?
A stout by any other moniker might indeed taste as sweet. Guinness’ dark, creamy brew was originally called Porter, and later Stout Porter, to denote its strength and popularity amongst U.K. train porters. In the late 18 th century, the then-singularly named Stout grew so successful that Guinness stopped brewing other varieties of beers, focusing instead on porters and stouts.

2. Out of Africa
Nearly 40% of Guinness is consumed somewhere in Africa. Of five Guinness-owned breweries worldwide, three are in African nations. Nigeria, home to one of those five breweries, is the world’s second-largest market for Guinness consumption. Great Britain is first, Ireland comes third, Cameroon fourth, and we in the U.S. stand in measly fifth place.

3. Trivial pursuit
Hold up. Was Freddie Mercury born in India or Zanzibar? Guinness is so dedicated to settling the sort of obscure debates born in bars that in 1954, managing director Hugh Beaver launched a compendium of little-known facts called the Guinness Book of Records. Originally intended as a marketing giveaway, the book became a runaway success upon its commercial release in 1955, and one of the oddest publishing sensations since an auto company named Michelin tackled fine dining.

4. Color block
It’s not black. It’s not even brown. Hold your beer up to the light – or, hey, maybe try drinking someplace that isn’t so dimly lit. You’ll see that Guinness is actually a deep, dark red, a color the company attributes in part to the roasting of malted barley during the beer’s preparation.

5. Progressive pints
Arthur Guinness, a wealthy Protestant with minimal beverage experience, founded his now-world-famous St. James’ Gate brewery in 1759. He happened to be an innovative human rights advocate, funding Ireland’s version of the Red Cross and creating housing developments for Dublin’s disenfranchised poor. As a company, Guinness supported Irish troops in both World Wars, guaranteeing its workers jobs upon return from service and paying their families a portion of their salary in absentia.

6. Get physical
Rich in iron and antioxidant compounds, a 20-ounce pint of Guinness is a mere 210 calories. Compare that to a 150-calorie glass of milk, and you’ve got yourself a healthy sip, rich enough to make the angels sing. Speaking of which….

7. Holy rollers
Generations of Guinness men worked to preserve Dublin’s historic Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, a national landmark and Ireland’s largest church. Benjamin Lee Guinness, Arthur’s third son, oversaw the 1860-1865 renovation that prevented the cathedral’s collapse.

8. Home is where the heart is
In 1997, the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan created the English conglomerate Diageo, which produces Jose Cuervo and Smirnoff. The quintessential Irish brew is thus no longer based in Dublin, but London.

9. Eight days a week
Miss St. Patrick’s Day this year? Consider kicking back with a cold one on Arthur’s Day, a corporate-sponsored “holiday” started in 2009. The next Arthur’s Day hits on September 27, 2013 at 5:59 p.m. (17:59 in local time, a nod to the year of Guinness’ founding), at which point a student-heavy crowd across the city toasts the success of Ireland’s heritage beer and yells in unison, “To Arthur!”

10. Kitchen staple
Guinness is a pantry workhorse. From tenderizing beef in a classic meat-and-potatoes Irish stew, to drizzling on plain-Jane vanilla ice cream for a sweet taste of the sauce, choosy cooks choose Guinness.

11. Feed your head
Bartenders are not being fussy when they insist on the double-pour. Unlike other taps, Guinness is dispensed through a five-hole disk restrictor plate (don’t worry about it just know it makes your beer delicious). It supplies an uncommon amount of nitrogen, making the head extra-effervescent. As such, two shifts are needed: one to start the magic, and a second to finish the job. The perfect pint is said to take 119.5 seconds to pour. But who’s counting?

What’s your favorite thing about Guinness? Sound off in the comments.

Note: This article has been edited and updated to correct certain inaccuracies.


7 Things You Never Knew About Rice

You probably haven&apost given rice much thought. It&aposs just a cooking staple with a permanent spot in your pantry, right? Wrong: Rice has an incredibly long history (with documentation of people eating it as early as 2500 B.C.), and some of its details are fascinating. Here, seven facts you probably didn&apost know about rice.

1. The Great Wall of China is held together with sticky rice. If you&aposve ever tried to remove caked-on rice from the bottom of a pot, you know how strong it can be. While the Great Wall was being built during the Ming dynasty in the 15th and 16th centuries, workers used a porridge made with rice along with calcium carbonate as a mortar to hold the wall&aposs stones together.

2. Rice is good for years—unless it&aposs brown. Uncooked white rice will stay fresh and edible for anywhere between 10 and 30 years (depending on how it is stored). But uncooked brown rice has a shelf life of just three to six months because the bran coating will oxidize.

3. Wild rice isn&apost rice. Wild rice is a distant relative to all of the other rices commonly eaten today, most of which are in the Oryza sativa family. Instead, wild rice is part of the Zizania genus. It&aposs a grain harvested from marsh grasses grown in North America and China.

4. All white rice starts brown. OK, you might know this one, but it&aposs important. White rice is just brown rice that&aposs been rid of its outer bran layer and polished.

5. Rice is grown on every continent except Antarctica. Rice is adaptable, easy to grow, and it has a very high yield, making it a terrific crop to grow anywhere and feed a large population. Just one seed of rice will result in over 3,000 grains.

6. Americans eat more than 20 pounds of rice every year. That might seem like a lot, but it&aposs nothing compared to the rest of the world. According to the US Rice Producers Association, people in Asia eat up to 300 pounds a year and residents of the United Arab Emirates consume 450 pounds per year. The French, on the other hand, eat hardly any rice at all—just ten pounds every year.

7. The largest bowl of fried rice was fed to pigs. In October 2015, 300 cooks teamed up in Yanzhou, China, to break the world record for the largest bowl of fried rice. They did it, creating a bowl of Yeung Chow fried rice (made with rice, eggs, chicken, ham, shrimp, dried scallops and vegetables) that weighed in at 9,242 pounds. Everyone celebrated until pictures emerged of some of the rice (deemed unfit for human consumption) being loaded into dump trucks and sent to pig farms. According to Guinness, the entirety of the rice needed to be edible (by humans) to qualify. So the record is still held by the Turkey Culinary Federation in Bolu, Turkey, which made a 6,944 pound bowlful.


9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Caesar Salad

Like apple pie, meatloaf, and hot dogs, Caesar salad has secured itself as an American food staple. In fact, it’s one of the most commonly-featured restaurant menu items in the country, having found places in both the finest of restaurants and most questionable of dumps. There is more to the romaine lettuce-based salad that meets the eye, though. Your favorite lunchtime indulgence has a rich history that may surprise even the most knowledgeable of food experts.

What is Caesar salad?

A traditional Caesar contains romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, lemon juice, eggs, parmesan, Worcestershire sauce or anchovies, and salt and pepper. Ingredient amounts vary from chef to chef, but the best (and most authentic) Caesar you’re going to get is tossed tableside to ensure freshness. (No, your bottled Kraft Caesar Salad is not an accurate representation of the original).

Scroll down for a brief history of the delicious dish, as well as a few random facts that will impress all of your future dinner guests.

1. The Caesar salad has nothing to do with Julius Caesar.

Though we’re sure the famous Roman wouldn’t have minded a plate of the dressing-doused greens, the Caesar salad is linked to chef and restaurateur Caesar Cardini. Cardini invented the recipe at his Tijuana restaurant, Caesar’s Bar and Grill, in 1924. Apparently they were running low on inventory during a 4th of July party and the dish was concocted using random ingredients found in the kitchen. The result was obviously delicious, resulting in a culinary classic that has withstood the test of time.

2. Caesar salad has its own holiday on July 4th.

It not only commemorates the day of its birth, but also makes for the perfect summer BBQ side dish. Frankly, the garlic content will have you seeing fireworks.

3. The original recipe did not contain anchovies.

Instead, Cardini used Worcestershire sauce in both his original recipe and bottled varieties. Try it both ways and decide which option reigns supreme.

4. The Guinness Record for the world’s largest caesar salad weighed in at a little over three tons.

Guinness Book of World Records

It was prepared by Canirac restaurant in Tijuana on October 20, 2007 and required a team of 160 participants. Not even a Brontosaurus could finish it.

5. Caesar salad is primarily responsible for an increase in romaine lettuce production.

There are nearly 80,000 acres of Romaine farms today, thanks mostly in part to fast food’s decision to top Caesar with grilled chicken and call it a health food. Hooray for domestically-raised produce and a better economy!

6. A traditional Caesar salad only contains one larger crouton and no grilled chicken or bacon.

Food and Drink/REX/Shutterstock

Sorry, meat lovers. We know you need your protein, but it wouldn’t fly with Cardini. (We’re sure McDonald’s could not care less.)

7. It was originally served as a finger food.

Rather than chopping the salad leaves, diners were able to pick them up by the stems and eat them. They’re no PF Chang’s lettuce wraps, but we kind of like this idea of deconstructed eating.

8. You should always use raw egg.

If you’re scared of salmonella, have no fear. The lemon juice’s acidity will typically kill any lingering bacteria. Plus, we’re pretty sure Arnold Schwarzenegger consumed a dozen raw eggs each day and he turned out, um, okay.

9. Caesar, in addition to the Cobb, introduced meal-sized salads.

Prior to its invention, salads were always meant to be side dishes and not filling entrees. But because Caesar tastes oh-so-good, we simply couldn’t get enough. Lunchtime office salads for all!

Craving Caesar’s crunchy, cheesy, salty goodness? Try it yourself with our traditional recipe. And don’t skimp on the anchovies! They provide an extra depth of flavor that will taste anything but fishy.


6. Say “No” to Bathtub Gin

Whiskey and moonshine might steal the spotlight when it comes to illegal imbibing during Prohibition. But gin was also popular due to how easy it was to create. Often made in bathtubs, this type of gin was created by mixing cheap grain alcohol with flavorings like juniper-berry juice and sometimes left to ferment and be distilled right from the tub. Bathtub gin wasn’t as clean as you might think the obvious lack of regulations lead to many illnesses and even deaths.


9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Caesar Salad

Like apple pie, meatloaf, and hot dogs, Caesar salad has secured itself as an American food staple. In fact, it’s one of the most commonly-featured restaurant menu items in the country, having found places in both the finest of restaurants and most questionable of dumps. There is more to the romaine lettuce-based salad that meets the eye, though. Your favorite lunchtime indulgence has a rich history that may surprise even the most knowledgeable of food experts.

What is Caesar salad?

A traditional Caesar contains romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, lemon juice, eggs, parmesan, Worcestershire sauce or anchovies, and salt and pepper. Ingredient amounts vary from chef to chef, but the best (and most authentic) Caesar you’re going to get is tossed tableside to ensure freshness. (No, your bottled Kraft Caesar Salad is not an accurate representation of the original).

Scroll down for a brief history of the delicious dish, as well as a few random facts that will impress all of your future dinner guests.

1. The Caesar salad has nothing to do with Julius Caesar.

Though we’re sure the famous Roman wouldn’t have minded a plate of the dressing-doused greens, the Caesar salad is linked to chef and restaurateur Caesar Cardini. Cardini invented the recipe at his Tijuana restaurant, Caesar’s Bar and Grill, in 1924. Apparently they were running low on inventory during a 4th of July party and the dish was concocted using random ingredients found in the kitchen. The result was obviously delicious, resulting in a culinary classic that has withstood the test of time.

2. Caesar salad has its own holiday on July 4th.

It not only commemorates the day of its birth, but also makes for the perfect summer BBQ side dish. Frankly, the garlic content will have you seeing fireworks.

3. The original recipe did not contain anchovies.

Instead, Cardini used Worcestershire sauce in both his original recipe and bottled varieties. Try it both ways and decide which option reigns supreme.

4. The Guinness Record for the world’s largest caesar salad weighed in at a little over three tons.

Guinness Book of World Records

It was prepared by Canirac restaurant in Tijuana on October 20, 2007 and required a team of 160 participants. Not even a Brontosaurus could finish it.

5. Caesar salad is primarily responsible for an increase in romaine lettuce production.

There are nearly 80,000 acres of Romaine farms today, thanks mostly in part to fast food’s decision to top Caesar with grilled chicken and call it a health food. Hooray for domestically-raised produce and a better economy!

6. A traditional Caesar salad only contains one larger crouton and no grilled chicken or bacon.

Food and Drink/REX/Shutterstock

Sorry, meat lovers. We know you need your protein, but it wouldn’t fly with Cardini. (We’re sure McDonald’s could not care less.)

7. It was originally served as a finger food.

Rather than chopping the salad leaves, diners were able to pick them up by the stems and eat them. They’re no PF Chang’s lettuce wraps, but we kind of like this idea of deconstructed eating.

8. You should always use raw egg.

If you’re scared of salmonella, have no fear. The lemon juice’s acidity will typically kill any lingering bacteria. Plus, we’re pretty sure Arnold Schwarzenegger consumed a dozen raw eggs each day and he turned out, um, okay.

9. Caesar, in addition to the Cobb, introduced meal-sized salads.

Prior to its invention, salads were always meant to be side dishes and not filling entrees. But because Caesar tastes oh-so-good, we simply couldn’t get enough. Lunchtime office salads for all!

Craving Caesar’s crunchy, cheesy, salty goodness? Try it yourself with our traditional recipe. And don’t skimp on the anchovies! They provide an extra depth of flavor that will taste anything but fishy.



Comments:

  1. Shagul

    Yes it's all science fiction

  2. Duk

    rubbish by God))))) the beginning looked at more was not enough))))

  3. Troy

    What about it will tell?

  4. Osla

    is not logical



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